Making Beef Bone Broth in the English Country Cooking Kitchen. © Sue Todd Photography 2016

Beef Bone Broth

We’ve been making stock from bones in the English Country Cooking Kitchen for years, but suddenly “Bone Broth” is a big thing, if not the thing.  So I guess we’re a bit late adding it to the blog, but whatever you call it, its pretty good stuff and way better for you than anything out of a packet, regardless of whatever the packet may try to suggest.

Making Beef Bone Broth in the English Country Cooking Kitchen. © Sue Todd Photography 2016

Making Beef Bone Broth in the English Country Cooking Kitchen. © Sue Todd Photography 2016

Ingredients:

  • Beef Bones, we used 3 beef short ribs with some meat left on.
  • 75 grams of lardons, we used home cured belly pork (recipe to follow soon),
  • 1 leek,
  • 2 large shallots
  • 2 carrots
  • 6-10 black peppercorns
  • 1 clove
  • 1 bouquet garni
  • 3 litres of cold water
  • butter and a splash of olive oil or beef fat for frying.
Bouquet Garni © Sue Todd Photography 2016

Bouquet Garni © Sue Todd Photography 2016

Method:

Roasted Beef Bones ready to make Beef Bone Broth. © Sue Todd Photography 2016

Roasted Beef Bones ready to make Beef Bone Broth. © Sue Todd Photography 2016

Roast the beef bones until the meat has receded along the bone, pour off the rendered fat and then allow to cool.  I use the roasting oven of the AGA.  If you are using a conventional oven you might want to put these in at the same time you are doing a roast to make it more cost efficient.
The ingredients for Beef Bone Broth. © Sue Todd Photography 2016

The ingredients for Beef Bone Broth. © Sue Todd Photography 2016

Chop all the vegetables and  fry in the butter or oil/fat until soft and starting to turn golden.
Vegetables for Beef Bone Broth. © Sue Todd Photography 2016

Vegetables for Beef Bone Broth. © Sue Todd Photography 2016

Add the water, bones, and the rest of the ingredients together and bring to the boil.
Cover and place in the simmering oven of the AGA for at least six hours and up to 12 hours, checking now and then to make sure the water level is ok and to skim off any froth that may form on the top.  You could also use a slow cooker for this, but check cooking times/controls with the manual.
Adding all the ingredients to the pan. © Sue Todd Photography 2016

Adding all the ingredients to the pan. © Sue Todd Photography 2016

Then strain out the liquid and discard the veg and bones etc.  Allow the stock to cool over night and then lift of any fat that may have set on the top.  Don’t forget you can re-use the fat for cooking with, so don’t discard that.
The stock is them ready to use.  If you don’t need it all at once it will freeze perfectly.
You don’t have to use beef bones you can make bone broth with any bones you happen to have.  We regularly tip the remains of the roast chicken from a Sunday roast into the pan to make broth, which then goes into soups, risotto etc.
For more standard stock recipes, Fish, Game, Veg, Chicken and Veal etc, check Practical Professional Cookery by Cracknell & Kaufmann.  As the name suggests these are professional recipes and produce much more stock that you would need but you can amend the quantities down to suit.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *